Astrotec Lyra Classic Review – Lens

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Pros –

Terrific build quality, Tonally excellent, Spacious yet layered soundstage

Cons –

Mediocre bass extension, Smooth high-end can miss some smaller details

Verdict –

The Astrotec Lyra Classic caters towards vocals lovers and those searching for an earbud with a neutral tone without the associated thinness.


Introduction –

Alongside Sennheiser’s infamous MX980 and Yuin’s PK1, Astrotec’s Lyra was one of the first to illuminate that the earbud form factor was brimming with life, potential and capability. The Lyra especially intrigued with its hybrid driver configuration making it one of the most advanced on the market. Since then, the market has matured, premium offerings are more abundant and we’ve seen greater refinement of single driver designs. The Lyra Classic is a testament to Astrotec’s bold original, utilising a 15mm single dynamic driver and the same gorgeous satin silver housings with micro-mesh filters and copper sound cavity. Moreover, Astrotec has reduced the asking price to $140 USD years later where most have succumb to inflation.

 

Disclaimer –

I would like to thank Astrotec very much for providing me with the Lyra Classic for the purpose of review. All words are my own and there is no monetary incentive for a positive review. Despite receiving the earbuds free of cost, I will attempt to be as objective as possible in my evaluation.

 

Accessories –

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The Lyra Classic has the same unboxing experience as the higher end Lyra Collection, with a clean outer sleeve adorning a magnetic hard box. Inside are the earbuds well protected within a foam inlet and the same terrific pleather hard case as included with the Collection.

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I’m sure users will appreciate how the foam inlet routes the cable in a loop, pre-forming the wire to sit over the ear upon unboxing. Astrotec includes a variety of accessories to ensure an optimal fit and flexible sound. Of note, the Classic comes with an aeroplane adapter, 3 pairs of donut foams and 3 sizes of wings in addition to ear guides.

 

Design –

The Lyra Classic is mostly similar to the Lyra Collection I reviewed at the end of 2017, with identical dimensions and, by correlation, fit. The buyer is flattered with the same gorgeous aluminium housings that feel absolute in their solidity. I was also highly impressed with Astrotec’s level of finish; when pixel peeping my photos, they were almost flawless where the majority of metal earbuds show small flaws up close. Their striking design is garnished in a mature titanium grey, and I subjectively prefer the Classic’s more subdued colour scheme to the blue Collection.

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The Lyra Classic is a fairly wide earbud, protruding slightly from the ear. As a result, it isn’t perfectly comfortable for sleeping, but the smaller diameter of the face (similar to the Yuin shell) enables a more flexible fit than most, especially for smaller eared listeners. As with the Collection, I found the Classic to be comfortable for hours on end, with no hotspot formation. Their over-ear design also provides a little extra stability over most earbuds. As they create minimal seal, the Lyra Classic barely isolates and will leak sound at high volumes, just like any other earbud.

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It’s unfortunate that Astrotec has omit the excellent cable on the Lyra Collection, instead opting for a more typical rubber unit as employed on their cheaper in-ears. This cable is just passable, it has a tacky texture that I’m not a fan of, and it’s also fairly stiff and springy on top. Despite this, microphonics don’t irk due to the earbud’s weak seal and the cable is well-relieved at its terminations. Still, it’s not nearly as compliant as the Collection’s gorgeous 8-braid unit and its texture makes it difficult to untangle.

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About Author

Avid writer, passionate photographer and full-time student, Ryan's audio origins and enduring interests lie within all aspects of portable audio. An ongoing desire to bring quality audio to the regular reader underpins his reviewer ethos as he seeks to bring a new perspective on the cutting edge and budget dredge alike.

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