CanJam Singapore 2018 – A Study in Portable Audio

5

A week-and-a-half ago, I was fortunate enough to attend arguably the largest portable audio festival the world has seen yet: CanJam Singapore 2018. I’ve been a regular attendee of the event ever since Singapore’s inclusion into the CanJam Global roadmap in 2016. Obviously, the show has matured tremendously in both manufacturer inclusion and fan participation – which has made it all the more fun to attend, yet all the more exhausting to properly cover. As per usual, I made IEMs (both custom and universal) my #1 focus – due to the sheer diversity and ease of the form factor – with the inclusion of a couple cable manufacturers for good measure. So now, without further adieu, I present to you my earnest in-ear coverage of CanJam Singapore 2018!

Photo courtesy of Head-Fi

Page 2: Advanced Acousticwerkes and DITA Audio
Page 3: 64Audio and Music Sanctuary’s Project K
Page 4: Custom Art and Lime Ears
Page 5: Jomo Audio and Vision Ears
Page 6: Effect Audio and PWAudio
Page 7: Verdict

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Share.

About Author

Church-boy by day and audio-obsessee by night, Daniel Lesmana’s world revolves around the rhythms and melodies we lovingly call: Music. When he’s not behind a console mixing live for a congregation of thousands, engineering records in a studio environment, or making noise behind a drum set, you’ll find him on his laptop analysing audio gear with fervor and glee. Now a specialist in custom IEMs, cables and full-sized headphones, he’s looking to bring his unique sensibilities - as both an enthusiast and a professional - into the reviewer’s space; a place where no man has gone before.

5 Comments

  1. MartinJoura on

    Hi All im rookie here. Good article! Thx! Thx!

  2. Surya Pratama Wijaya on

    Hi deezel, thanks for replying.

    How would the n8t and sound writer compare to the A18 tzar. I was looking top midrange and treble performance, clean speration and layering and also slightly boosted but accurate bass. I listen to pop, edm and acoustic covers both male and female vocals mostly. An i am looking for a custom.

    Recommendations deeply appreciated.

    Btw how is the ergonomics and pliability of the wires of saladin and 1950s say compared to the latest from effect audio and plussound.

    Best Regards,
    Surya

    • Deezel on

      Hi Surya,

      The entire Soundwriter write-up is a comparison against the U18t; unfortunately I can’t get any more specific without an extended listen between the two. The N8t is a much warmer, richer and bodied IEM than the U18t. The U18t is cleaner and clearer, while the N8t has a bold, voluminous bass, a butter-y midrange and a more controlled treble. It looks like what you’re looking for is an emphasis on technical performance, with moderate body from the bass, so for your preferences, I’d recommend the Soundwriter.

      All of PWAudio’s are as pliant and ergonomic as Effect Audio and PlusSound’s offerings. The only aspect in which they differ is in the feel or touch of the insulation; EA and PS’s insulations are softer to the touch. But, in usability alone, they’re pretty equal. The 1950s’ insulation was still pre-production, so I can’t comment.

  3. Surya on

    Hi deezel,
    Thanks for you excellent coverage of canjam SG. Could you rate your top three fav iems and top three fav cables. Just to sum up your overall expwriences during Can jam.

    Thanks

    Best Regards,
    Surya

    • Deezel on

      Hi Surya,

      Thanks so much for your kind words! My top three IEMs there in terms of overall performance and personal preference were the N8t, the Soundwriter and the Vision Ears Erlkonig. But, the three most surprisingly impressive (especially in terms of value-for-money) were the AAW A3H, the Jomo Type X and a tie between the FIBAE ME and Model X.

      Cable-wise, my top three were the Saladin+, the Janus D and the 1950s. I love the Saladin+ for its warm, bodied and natural tone, mated with great imaging and stage stability. The Janus D isn’t as warm as the Saladin+ in tone, but it does have a natural timbre balanced skilfully with strong technical performance and finesse in its note release. The 1950s is absolutely a cost-no-object item, but its open stage, colourless tone and bass performance have made it an almost must-have for me. I’ve honestly never heard the Phantom sound as good.

Leave A Reply