Avara Custom AV2 – The Shape of Water

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DISCLAIMER: Avara Custom provided me with the AV2 in return for my honest opinion. I am not personally affiliated with the company in any way, nor do I receive any monetary rewards for a positive evaluation. The review is as follows.

Avara Custom is a company that recently made waves in my hometown of Jakarta, Indonesia; promising competitive CIEMs at affordable prices. Founder Alvon Harianto first conceived the company to combat the three problems that plague commercial CIEMs in Indonesia today: lengthy turnaround times, inaccessible prices and the hassle of maintenance. After months of pre-production, Avara officially launched early this year with a bang. Equipped with 3D-printed shells, numerous cosmetic options and impressive sonic performance, their debut models quickly rose to the apex of value. The one we have for review is the AV2, priced at IDR 3,000,000 (just over US$220 at the time of writing). It is by far the most affordable CIEM in my collection, and it is one of the most transparent 2-driver IEMs I’ve ever heard.

Avara Custom AV2

  • Driver count: Two balanced-armature drivers
  • Impedance: N/A
  • Sensitivity: N/A
  • Key feature(s) (if any): SLA 3D-printed shells
  • Available form factor(s): Universal and custom acrylic IEM
  • Price: IDR 3,000,000
  • Website: www.avara-custom.com

Build and Accessories

Avara built and shipped the AV2 within five days of receiving my ear impressions. They arrived in a white box with a glossy purple Avara logo embossed on top. Alongside the IEMs themselves, the company included a catalog brochure, a warranty card, a small zip-up case, a cleaning tool and various forms of apparel; including an Avara cable clip, sticker and keychain. Now this is the kind of effort I wanna see put into accessories and branding. I commend Avara for offering superb value without falling into the trap of cutting corners, and I’d love to see other manufacturers follow suit.

Cosmetically, I decided to go all out on my AV2’s design; boasting candy black shells, Amara wood faceplates, mechanical watch parts, and gold Avara logos. The extras I chose bring the total cost up to IDR 4,200,000 (just over US$310 at the time of writing); a still-modest price compared to the rest of the competition. Physically, the AV2 is one of the best-built IEMs in my collection. The 3D-printed shells flaunt an even flawless finish, and they shine brilliantly in the light. Where most budget companies struggle with build, the AV2 flourishes with flying colours. So far, it’s proven itself as a product that should be taken very seriously, and that sentiment all but continues when it comes to sound.

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About Author

Church-boy by day and audio-obsessee by night, Daniel Lesmana’s world revolves around the rhythms and melodies we lovingly call: Music. When he’s not behind a console mixing live for a congregation of thousands, engineering records in a studio environment, or making noise behind a drum set, you’ll find him on his laptop analysing audio gear with fervor and glee. Now a specialist in custom IEMs, cables and full-sized headphones, he’s looking to bring his unique sensibilities - as both an enthusiast and a professional - into the reviewer’s space; a place where no man has gone before.

5 Comments

  1. Hi deezel. Personally, which would you recommend among the avara custom v2, symphonium audio aurora and fiio fh5? Thanks!

    • Hey Lance,

      Unfortunately, I haven’t heard the Aurora or the FH5 yet. I should be auditioning them within the next couple months, so please remind me then if you don’t mind waiting. Thanks for your comment!

      Cheers,
      Daniel

  2. Hi, deezel. I’m looking to get a earpiece within the 300 dollars range. Personally, which would you recommend among the avara custom v2, fiio fh5 and Symphonium Audio Aurora . Thanks!

    • Hi Leehan,

      Honestly, I haven’t heard the AV3 in months, so I can’t give you a very accurate comparison. Generally-speaking though, the AV3 has a more all-rounder-oriented signature. Its midrange is more in line with the bass and treble, though the mid-bass in particular is slightly accentuated for that “mainstream” sound typically associated with pop music, etc. It has the standard upper-midrange peak for clarity, as well as a linear treble response for versatility. I apologise if I can’t go into any further detail, but I hope this’ll suffice for now. 🙂

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