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Earfun Wave Pro: Bang-for-buck

Disclaimer: I would like to formally thank Helen from Earfun for providing us with a unit in exchange for an impartial and honest review. On behalf of the team at the Headphone List, we thank her for her generosity and trust in THL.

TLDR:

The Earfun Wave Pro strikes all the chords the average consumer is looking for comfort, battery life, reliable ANC and great sound quality. While the Wave Pro isn’t sonically exciting vis-a-vis other more ‘serious’ headphones in the audiophile space, the Wave Pro is an all-rounder with dependable clarity.

For $79.99, it’s difficult to identify any real-world competitors that match its performance.

Pros:

+ High-quality plastic frame with collapsible hinges for stability.

+ Portable carry case.

+ Impressive battery life (both ANC and non-ANC activated)

+ Soft V-shaped sound signature with good top-to-bottom clarity.

+Good headroom and lateral width with decent imaging proficiency.

+Taut bass response deviates from commonly flabby and poor bass control on consumer headphones.

+ ANC doesn’t negatively impact fundamental frequency response heavily.

Cons:

– Bass performance lacks mid-bass impact or dynamism

– Bass texturing is average

– Ambient mode doesn’t allow enough extraneous noise in

Introduction

Earfun is a consumer audio company specialising in the design and manufacture of high-quality wireless audio devices for day-to-day use. Founded in 2018, Earfun’s lengthy catalogue is littered with awards and commendations from industry pundits such as What Hi-Fi and the VGA Awards.

Now, I don’t speak on behalf of all existing audiophiles, but it is safe for me to say, that audio-enthusiasts have a high willingness for inconvenience, as long as we manage to eke out as much sonic detail from the signal chain. While Bluetooth audio has made remarkable strides in the last 5-10 years, audiophiles still scrutinise wireless audio with an air of unwavering scepticism.

However, there is no denying that the elimination of cumbersome wires in our daily lives is a vindicating experience that needs to be experienced firsthand. On the other side of the pendulum, consumers are happy to sacrifice sound quality in exchange for varied quality-of-life improvements. Brands like Earfun understand this largely unspoken role.

Today, we’re examining and reviewing the Wave Pro, Earfun’s much-anticipated exploration of wireless headphones. Priced at $79.99, the Wave Pro is situated in the budget segment of the market. As global economies tough it out against persistent inflation, $79.99 is a modest price tag that is welcomed. However, what matters is how it objectively and subjectively performs.

The Wave Pro can be purchased from Earfun’s official web store.

Technology

Quiet Smart 2.0 ANC

The Wave Pro offers hybrid active noise cancellation powered by Quiet Smart 2.0 ANC, which automatically and concurrently eliminates in-ear and extraneous ambient noise via a complex series of in-ear and feed-forward microphones. By adapting to your listening circumstances, the Wave Pro can eliminate up to 45 dB of wind noise ingress.

LDAC and Hi-Res Audio Certified

Compatible with lossless codec, LDAC, the Wave Pro can stream 24-bit audio for ‘Hi-Res’ audio, providing listeners with the flexibility of listening to their music in an uncompressed format.

40mm Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) Composite Dynamic Drivers

In the audiophile space, DLC is a common flexure material that doesn’t warrant much surprise. However, most mainstream wireless audio products do not disclose the physical composition of their drivers.

DLC enhances the surface rigidity and tensile strength of the diaphragm. Accordingly, the driver can more efficiently pulsate forward and backward as a singular piston without any modal breakups across its surface. Distortion is noticeably reduced, and the resulting sonic performance is improved significantly.

Unboxing

The Earfun Wave Pro comes packaged in a basic cardboard box. The Wave Pro comes pre-packaged with the following accessories:

  • Wave Pro Headphones
  • Fabric Hard Case
  • 3.5mm to 3.5mm unbalanced cable
  • USB-C to USB-C charging cable

The Fabric Hard Case that the Wave Pro comes stowed feels robust, with a fabric exterior and felt inner to avoid scratching the headphones contained within it. The fabric exterior is impervious to hard thumps or drops, offering ample protection for day-to-day carry.

The entire package provides adequate accompaniments for immediate use.

Design

The Wave Pro has a generic (this isn’t a pejorative) silhouette with collapsible side hinges with swivelling earcups. The hinges themselves are easy to operate without too much or too little resistance, with a decent structural integrity. The entire shell is manufactured from satinized plastic in space grey.

There are no touch controls on the Wave Pro. Instead, the headphones can be controlled via a series of buttons on the underside of the right channel. The buttons are a smidgen mushy, with middling travel and tactility. Nonetheless, they get the job done, and they’ve never failed to register my input.

Comfort and Ergonomics

The Wave Pro is an over-ear (circumaural) headphone fitted with a skin-friendly protei-leather headband and earpads. Touchpoints where the Wave Pro contacts my ears and head generally did not render any noticeable discomfort. However, the circumaural cups lack physical give above my oblong earlobes, which can breed discomfort from pressing against the outer earlobe.

The plastic physical frame is lightweight at 250g, blending into day-to-day usage. The Wave Pro may not be the sleekest or most modern of designs, but it indexes satisfactorily for substance points.

Turn to the next page for Features and Battery Life

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ABOUT AUTHOR

Picture of Kevin Goh

Kevin Goh

Raised in Southeast Asia’s largest portable-audio market, Kevin’s interest in high-end audio has grown alongside it as the industry flourishes. His pursuit of “perfect sound” began in the heydays of Jaben in Singapore at the age of just 10 years old. Kevin believes that we live in a golden age of readily accessible, quality audio.

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