Rank #14: Rhapsodio Galaxy V2

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Building further on their former RTi1 single dynamic driver, the Galaxy’s driver is an evolution of the UltraMag technology. The Galaxy is the product of Sammy’s quest for ultimate resolution, and his take on an uncolored sound. The result is a hyper-detailed presentation – with excellent bass.

Rhapsodio Galaxy V2
-Driver:                     Single dynamic driver
-Impedance:             17.5 Ohm
-Sensitivity:               102 dB
-Fit:                             Universal (Spiral Dot tips)

-MRSP:                       $1450


The cable 

At the time, the Galaxy was bundled with the Rhapsodio OCC mk. 2. The OCC mk. 2 is a slightly warm copper cable, due to an enhanced mid-bass. The mid-bass is moderate in control, and creates a mildly warm stage structure. But it has a natural tone, while the warmth isn’t overdone. In addition, its extension is better than a stock OFC cable, although the difference isn’t overly large. The same can be said for its resolution and transparency.

Even though the pairing adds a smoother touch to the brighter Galaxy, I was more of a fan of the original cable that the Galaxy was paired with, the 2.98 silver/gold due to its warmer, more midforward sound. Overall, the OCC mk. 2 might have the better tone, the 2.98 and Galaxy was a case of opposites attract: it 2.98 added a bit more body to the midrange, and provided a smoother tone. As is, the pairing with the OCC mk. 2 is quite good, and it’s nice to see a quality cable being included. 

Sound impressions

Presentation
The Galaxy is Sammy’s translation of a perfect sound, with its foundation on two pillars: an uncolored signature, and high resolution. The Galaxy’s treble extension is quite good, and its signature is indeed almost completely flat throughout the frequency range – save for a significant 5 KHz peak. The result is an extraordinary amount of detail, with a decisive emphasis on the articulation of notes. The upper midrange peak can be a popular tuning choice for different reasons. It strips midrange notes from thickness and veil, which reduces their purity so to speak. We’ll see it return for similar reasons later on. We’ve also seen the 5 KHz peak being tuned for its ability to create a more natural form of clarity, as with Aether and Deca. In both cases, Emil and Mike manipulated the quantity of the bass and treble to balance the tone. The Galaxy in turn pairs its upper midrange peak with a linear bass and treble. The result: a brighter and somewhat leaner sound.

In line with its prominent upper midrange, the Galaxy brings string instruments and cymbals are to the foreground, with a clear and sparkly resonance. However, the relative prominence of the upper midrange results in a leaner note structure – especially male vocals might miss a bit of body. But we haven’t yet mentioned one of the Galaxy’s strongest features – its bass. This is a bass that possesses all of the virtues of a dynamic driver, while throwing in a few of BA’s as well. It has great texture and impact, but is equally controlled and relatively quick; a wonderful hybrid of both technical as well as engaging qualities.


The Galaxy creates a fairly classic stage. While the stage is wide with an average depth, it isn’t particularly tall. Most importantly, the vocal stage positioning is laidback, with a relatively forward instrument placement. Due to the distant vocal position, its layering ability could be better; there’s not much space behind the vocal, so it relies mostly on its width or the space in front. But it does have one advantage to parry; as notes are on the leaner side, they create more space on the stage. In addition, the stage is quite airy due to the upper midrange emphasis and controlled bass. So overall, its separation is quite good. In addition, the high resolution and precise imaging further contribute to the clarity of the image.

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About Author

Nic is currently in pursuit of a PhD degree in social neuropsychology, while trying not to get too distracted by this hobby. In pursuit of theoretical knowledge by day, and audiophile excellence at night. Luckily for him, both activities are not mutually exclusive which helps to lighten the workload. Always on the go, Nic's enthusiasm for hi-fi is focused on all chains of the portable system: iems, cables and daps.

2 Comments

  1. Lord Sinister on

    Excellent review! How would you compare to something like the LZ A4 or FLC8, especially the lower regions? Thanks.

    • flinkenick on

      Thank you dear Lord, however I’m going to have to disappoint you there since I haven’t heard either.

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