Jomo 6R Custom In-Ear Monitor Review

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Selected Comparisons:

Lear LCM-BD4.2 ($1300) vs Jomo 6R ($1030)

Please note that the test is determined with Lear’s lowest bass quantity.

Lear has a little more power and quantity in sub-bass section of lows with a natural tone and texture in accordance with the dynamic driver advantage. Both have a good speed in sub-bass section, but Lear decreases the speed level when the bass quantity is increased. Both monitor have similar amounts of mid-bass and don’t tighten stage. In addition, Lear provides a slightly more emotional mid-bass tone.

Lear locates midrange slightly laid-back compared to the J6R; overall resolution and transparency levels are similar. Lear sounds a bit brighter, while the J6R has more control on the tonality. Both don’t sound weighty, but the J6R sounds thicker by a small margin in comparison.

Both have similar amounts of treble, but the J6R has a little more natural and weightier high frequency presentation. The extension and resolution is similar, while the J6R is slightly better when it comes to fast tracks. In addition, both are not much forgiving against bad recordings, but Lear gets smoother pursuant to the bass quantity.

Lear has a deeper and more spacious stage, but both have clear and neutral spaces around instruments. Both have similar separation levels as well as the background blackness. However, Lear locates the background slightly more distant in comparison. In addition, Lear is a little better in terms of timing and coherence.

The Custom Art Harmony 8.2 Silicone ($1200) vs Jomo 6R ($1030)

The Custom Art’s latest monitor has greater low frequency quantity with a similar speed in fast metal tracks. The H8.2 provides a better decay and more emotional tone. The H8.2 has a more prominent mid-bass presentation. Due to that difference, the J6R sounds airy, while the H8.2 is emotional and warmer.

While the J6R’s midrange is more transparent and brighter, the H8.2 sounds more natural and musical. Even the J6R seems to be more resolved, it cuts notes’ sub-section a bit too early in order to keep the presentation resolved. Overall note recreation is thicker on the H8.2, while the J6R sounds more technical. The H8.2 has a better sub-section body in note releasing and it is weightier overall. Therefore, the H8.2 has more full-bodied vocals and carries more emotion, while the J6R sounds cleaner with a bit stress on vocals.

The J6R has quite prominent highs with a brighter and analytic tone, while the H8.2 sounds smoother with a laid back treble presentation. The J6R articulates details more; the H8.2 has more forgiving treble notes. Lastly, both perform well in fast metal tracks.

The H8.2 has a deeper presentation, while the J6R’s stage is wider. The H8.2 has a blacker background with warm spaces, while J6R has more airy stage and clearer spaces in comparison. The coherence, the separation, and the focus are better on the H8.2 and the presentation is easier to follow.

Noble Audio Savanna S ($999) vs Jomo 6R ($1030) 

The Savanna S has a little more power in sub-bass section with a more emotional tone in comparison. Both provide tight hits, while Jomo 6R has a more technical approach. In mid-bass section, the Savanna S has significantly more prominence with a warm tone that results in a weightier and warmer sound overall.

The J6R has a brighter and thinner note structure with better transparency, while the Savanna S is more musical and weightier. The J6R articulates details more and sounds more airy in the midrange with a slightly better resolution, but the Savanna S is more natural and effortless. In addition, the Savanna S has slightly more body and emotion when it comes to vocal performance, but both have stress. In the upper midrange, Savanna S has thinner attacks in accordance with lower treble notes.

The Jomo 6R has more treble quantity, while the Savanna S recreates smoother notes. Although the Savanna S is thicker in the midrange, the Jomo 6R has more body in the treble and sounds less colored.

The J6R has a significantly more airy stage with much cleaner spaces around instruments. On the other hand, the Savanna S outperforms the J6R in terms of background blackness and the stage depth, while the J6R has a wider stage. The separation seems to be similar, but the Savanna S takes the advantage with its blacker and more stable background. In addition, the Savanna’s presentation is easier to follow regarding the coherence comparison.

Effect Audio Leonidas Pairing:

Leonidas is a smooth and balanced sounding cable with an exception of the slight fullness in low frequency that results in a weightier presentation.

Leonidas makes the J6R more controlled, refined, and definitely smoother. The lows are a little more prominent and fuller compared to stock cable with a more natural tone. Hits become a bit grander and the Leonidas releases better-textured notes.

The midrange is weightier, more resolved, and thicker with the Leonidas, while the stock cable sounds messy and brighter. Vocals have more body and depth with lesser tendency to sibilance on the Leonidas. In the high frequency, Leonidas significantly betters the stock cable by making the treble presentation smoother, and more forgiving.

In terms of soundstage, the Leonidas doesn’t really change the width, but it significantly improves the background blackness and locates it more distant. In addition, the stage becomes deeper and the separation gets better.

Final Words:

Jomo 6R has an airy, technical, and neutral approach with a terrific transparency. Some may find it a bit bright in accordance with the source used, but it provides quite clear spaces around instruments. The J6R sounds great with a suitable aftermarket IEM cable and gets definitely better in terms of tonality. It can be purchased directly from Jomo Audio themselves. Its regular price is 1399 SGD (approx. $1030) with the exception of customization and package options.

Please click here for Jomo Audio website.

 

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About Author

He started listening music when he was a child. His audiophile journey has begun under the wings of a single dynamic driver IEM. He has started to search for both technical and musical perfection in audio gears. He mostly reviews high-end systems including custom in ear monitors, aftermarket cables and digital sources.

2 Comments

  1. ezekiel77 on

    Hi, I’m looking for a neutral CIEM with a big soundstage. Hoping it sounds more musical than analytical, with a bit of treble sparkle. Looking at this, Perfect Seal AR6 and HUM Pristine reference. Would you recommend any of them? Thanks for your time.

    • MikePortnoy on

      Hi,

      Perfect Seal AR6 may be better for your needs. HUM Pristine custom version sounds a bit aggressive in terms of the stage structure. Also, you may take a look to Lear LCM-BD4.2

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